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machines. it is not about titles or power struggles within. it is not about dividing america and it is not about one individual politician. this is about the people! this is the people's movement! [ cheering ] >> sean: tphoufpbds of support on hand -- thousands of supporters were on hand. it was estimated only 100ç anti-tea party protesters showed up. that says a lot about whose side the momentum is onúd-gsru now in america, doesn't it? joining me former white house press secretary dana perino and fox news contributor, pat caddell. welcome, good to see you. [ applause ] >> sean: let me start, yesterday steny hoyer was out there saying the tone in america is dangerous. we've got to lower theç volume here. at the same time, we've got a united states congressman wanting to punch bill o'reilly in the nose and saying blank the f-word the tea party movement. with where is the insightful rhetoric coming from? >> you can't pick up a newspaper today without reading about how angry the conservative movement is. i read three stories in the "washington post". my local paper. if you
. hello, america. i was talking to a friend of mine and we were talking about the constitution and some of the bills being passed in congress and i said that is 2800-pages. the constitution is four. when they wrote it out -- granted they were giant pieces of paper, but four. out of all of the things that the founders could have tackled first, what did they say? we're going to make promises to the states. we willle never violate these things. what was the first thing they chose? the first amendment, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion. freedom of religion. freedom of speech. speech and religion, number one. i don't think it was because a won a coin toss against excessive bail. i think they did it because it was the most important right to protect because of where they came from. they had just come from a country where you couldn't have that freedom. you couldn't choose your own religion or speak out against the government or the religion because they were one and if you did you better watch your back. also they knew history always repeats itself. history al
in america and reduce our dependence on middle eastern oil. but that is not the policy we have. the president has the epa out there trying to bully the country. we are turning the other way and saying, c none saying dispositionap and trade energy -- we are turning the other way and saying, none of this past and trade energy tax -- cap and trade energy tax. the president followed that up with a $1.9 trillion increase in the national debt. increased the credit card of the country. we had already maxed out the credit card, but the president said that was not enough. he wanted to double down. he created a government takeover of health care. the bill grew and grew and grew. there were backroom deals analyzed a -- and lies. before they passed it, they had to have a reconciliation bill to fix the problems of the first bill before it was even signed into law. the health care czar has the authority to take your health care away from you even if you like it. what are we doing with all of these czars? get rid of them in. [applause] you have literally got a shot of government running around. you have c
: two champions of justice on the state of equality in america. >> not much has changed, or will change, for the folks at the bottom of the well. >> the opposite of poverty is not wealth. i think in america, the opposite of poverty is justice. >> moyers: stay tuned. >> from our studios in new york, bill moyers. >> moyers: welcome to "the journal". on this weekend, 42 years ago, dr. martin luther king jr. was assassinated-- gunned down in memphis, tennessee. many of us still have the images etched in painful memory-- dr. king standing with colleagues on the balcony of the lorraine motel, the next day lying there mortally wounded, his aides pointing in the direction of the rifle shot. >> everybody wants freedom. >> moyers: then we remember the crowds of mourners slowly moving through the streets of atlanta on a hot sunny day, surrounding king's casket as it was carried on a mule-drawn farm wagon; and the riots that burned across the nation in the wake of his death; a stinging, misbegotten rebuke to his gospel of non-violence. we sanctify his memory now, name streets and schools after him,
disciplines. and each operates uniquely with basically only two other institutions in america. and almost none around the world. the two in america being the national institutes of health, and national science foundation. where we allocate federal funds based on peer review. and so we bring the best and the brightest in america in various fields to assess projects or grants or scholarship. of one kind or another. and so when you ask about goals, one is to preserve the institution as it's come in to being. and has developed a rather wonderful track record. but beyond that, they are challenges of the time. and so i've laid forth two that i consider to be initiatives that aren't exactly goals but there's a hard, kind of thin line between a goal and an initiative. one i called bridging cultures where we're looking at putting a greater emphasis on what it is that makes a people a people. and then what it is that makes people differentiated. and we're a society that has a wondrous national culture. but we are also a mosaic of subcultures. so understanding ourselves is very important. and then we're
. >> another check on traffic and weather every 10 minutes. somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. >> it is 6:00 then on this tuesday morning. welcome back. i'm adam caskey outside the virginia square metro station. it's not a bad day in the beltway. we have some cooler outlying areas. it's 51 degrees right here. in stafford it's in the upper 30's. this is a popular family, looking east from chesapeake beach over the chesapeake bay, a few clouds in the sky. clouds will increase throughout the midday and afternoon. 49 in chesapeake beach. today will be seasonable with highs in the upper 60's. morning sunshine gives way to midday clouds. gentle rain showers tomorrow. scattered, light rain. the weekend looks unse
it was in this building that we were building a fan base. i still remember that day. it was a picture of what america is about. you have people from all different walks of life coming together. everybody was working hard. everybody knew there was a challenge coming. everybody was there because they figured if we were all working together then there was the reason why we cannot handle this. we had handled things before. that is the american spirit on display that is this theory -- spirit of quincy and illinois. it is good to be reminded that and come back to spend time with you. we spent some time in iowa and missouri and now back here. yay., misery. how about i attaci left? we are in illinois. over the last couple of days we have talked to workers who are busy building when a blaze for these wind turbines and by a few plants, family and small- business owners trying to navigate through tough economy and talk to farmers about what is happening. because it is folks like pawlenty live in towns like quincy and give america its heartbeat, that is why it is so important. if this sounds like this were worki
our viewers think about this. a question today is do you think america has fallen behind as we've -- joe has just said? we have. why do you think it's true when it comes to protecting the environment. e-mail us by logging on to cnn.com/hln and we're going to be checking out your views a little bit later. >>> now, take charge of your career. if you've been out of work for a few months and you do find a job, you are probably thrilled. good for you. but starting any new job is going to be hard and it's even harder after a long lay-off, so here's how to make a successful reentry back into the work force. "the wall street journal" says, one, read up about your industry. have your boss describe your job very specifically so you can get as ready as possible. then a few day s before your first day, go do a test run. see how long it's going to get you to shower, to get there, whether it's finding your way on the road or taking a subway so you're going to be on time and ready and confident on your first day. now, this one may be the hardest. don't make the same mistakes twice. now, maybe
and jeff sessions, republican of alabama. >>> then america's role in the world. how will this week's agreement on nuclear disarmament make the country safer? why are so many friends and foes alike defying the united states? our conversation with secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> finally the roundtable takes on the growing left-right divide over the president's leadership, the congressional elections and the politics of the court. columnist for "the new york times" david brooks, chief washington correspondent for "the new york times" david sanger, syndicated "washington post" columnist kathleen parker and former democratic congressman from tennessee and chair of the democratic leadership council, harold ford, junior. >>> first, the politics of the supreme court. the president has another big decision to make, the second court vacancy in two years. how are the white house and republicans weighing the confirmation battle ahead? joining us to talk about that exclusively, two members at the heart of the debate, senate judiciary committee, chai
. if we jump cheap corn into latin america -- dump cheap corn into latin america, what happens to the corn farmer in latin america? i think we need to ask that question. it needs to be part of the conversation. because i can't imagine most people who are undocumented really wanting to have to leave their home, their families, their friends to come to a country that they don't know or they don't necessarily speak the language, where they don't necessarily really know anyone, to try to make a life. they probably would rather stay home. but there's something that is drawing them here and it probably has something to do with our, you know, the great economy of the united states, but it probably also has something to do with the trade and agriculture policy which put a lot of pressure on economies in this hemisphere. so, with that, madam speaker, i'm just going to say, i'm going to yield back for the close to congressman polis, madam speaker, who has really been a champion on this issue, who has really kept the fire burning on it and i think, madam speaker, that we all owe him a debt of gratitu
ignited a firestorm of controversy across america with copycat legislation on the way. the president put it this way -- >> you can imagine if you are hispanic-american in arizona, you're great grandparents may have been there before arizona was even a state. but now suddenly if you don't have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you're going to be harassed. that's something that could potentially happen. that's not the right way to go. >> you know, that sound bite really hit me. the magnitude of what the president just said. the president of the united states of america, just talked to people in a crowd saying you might be need something papers to stay legal in america. now the president is a constitutional scholar and a person of color. he is uniquely qualified and understands why this law is unamerican and racist. the story also has the attention of america's top law enforcement officials. he is attorney general mark holder. >> that law is an unfortunate one. i think that it is, i fear, subject to potential abuse and i'm very concerned about the wedge that it could d
>>> good morning, america. i'm george stephanopoulos. >> and i'm robin roberts. it's monday, april 26th. inside the heart of the stone. our cameras follow the massive tornado from louisiana to mississippi. rescue crews still searching for survivors. we're live on the scene. >>> and financial showdown. we have an exclusive interview with the key republican senator. >>> also, the fda is expected to greenlight the first vaccine to fight cancer. >>> and you remember her, lost for four days. now this brave little girl and her family join us for the first time since her miraculous rescue. >> got to love that early morning smile. and welcome back. tell us about your adventure. >> so, i'm gone a couple days, george, you change the place. back to the future here. >> this is all new for me. right here in the middle here of times square. >> best seat in the house. there was more dangerous weather overnight. but the big story this morning, the 250-mile path of destruction cut by as massive twister in g, mississippi. ten people killed there. hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed. trees uproote
states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. and if you will now remain standing, it is my delight as a mother to introduce you to a young woman will be singing the national anthem. ♪ >>oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. o say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪ [applause] great. ladies and gentlemen, that was fantastic. can we have another round of applause? [applause] >> this is a great honor for me. i am new to the stage in national politics. but i would like to say that this is the opportunity of a lifetime, because i believe the event that we are all at today is the first event on the path to taking back the congress of the
as a friend, and america is very fortunate to have his talent as secretary of agriculture. i am honored to be here, to be speaking with you. the first speaker at this club was theodore roosevelt. i do want to point out that both peter roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant secretaries -- both theodore roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant -- were assistant secretaries of the navy. [laughter] there was a time when the navy only had three commissioned brigades, the united states, the consolation, and the constitution. we had a tiny navy, and one which had never fought. since the days of the revolution, the navy had been pretty quiet, although you could make a pretty good argument that the reason america changed the articles of confederation to the constitution that we have today it was because we could not build a national and navy to deal with the barbary pirates. that was one reason for the changes in philadelphia in 1789. in 1798, then secretary of the navy had three ships, a few marines to sail on those ships, and a decidedly limited navy. today, things have changed a l
in the 1950s. plus america's jobless. >> it makes me just question what's going to happen? what are we going to do? how are we going get through this? >> how are we going to get through from unemployed to the boss lady. a frustrated job seeker stitches herself a home-based business and tiger woods tees off at the masters today. what do you think of his week in the spotlight and how about this? what do you think about his new tv ad? our blog question today at cnn.com/tony. good morning, everyone. i'm tony harris. those stories and your comments right here, right now in the cnn "newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> we start with the setback in the search for four missing coal miners in west virginia. rescue crews made it inside the mine and they were forced to turn back because of the terrible air quality. >> they are in danger and that's the whole intent of evacuating them from the mine. >> okay, cnn's brooke bolduan on the scene from west virginia. first, the setback has got to be really tough to take for the family members waiting for any news at this point. >> reporter: yeah
and destroying the revenue of feudal culture in america, to transatlantic travel, the california gold rush and the growth of the united states to a continental nation. the start of travel across central america and a planting of the sea that was to become the panama canal. the crushing of the notorious american filibuster, william walker, in his attempted up scarred with the country of nicaragua. the construction of the confederate ironclad merrimack and the safeguarding of the union gold shipment, the fabled stock manipulation of the gary mill road and the birth of modern corporation. the consolidation of the great new york rail lines in the unarmed new york central and hudson river railroad. the growth of new city and to the first day of america. and at major world of a finance and trade complete with its first grand central station. vanderbilt played a major part in all of these events, and more. as t.j. stiles writes the commodores live left his mark on america's most basic beliefs about equality and opportunity did he start a business at the very epitome of the jacksonian ideal am a w
about this. the question today, do you think america has fallen behind as joe has said we have. why do you think that's true when it comes to protecting the environment? log on to cnn.com/hln and we'll be checking out your views a little later. >>> delivery room tragedy left a new mother paralyzed and unable to speak four years ago. now her parent says she wants to see her children, but her ex-husband is fighting it. why he says he wants to keep her from seeing their kids. [ wheezing ] i have asthma. and that's what it sounded like when my symptoms came back. i'd get this tightness in my chest. like i was breathing through a straw. so i went back to my doctor again. we talked about choices in controller medicines. we chose symbicort to help control my asthma. [ man ] while it's not a rescue inhaler, symbicort improves my lung function, starting within 15 minutes. it helps give me the control to... [ inhales, exhales ] symbicort is a combination of two medicines. it will not replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms and should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort contains fo
, it is an unfair program. it is yet another chapter in america, the bailout nation, that is co-authored by the present and by speaker pelosi. it takes $50 billion from taxpayer or borrowers the money from the chinese to bail out banks that made bad loans and to bail out many who buy more home than they could afford. speculated in residential real estate or use their home equity as an atm machine. we must remember that 94% of americans own their home outright. they rent over the our current on the mortgage and they're being asked to bail out the other 6%. it's a policy that says to the citizens who work hard, who live within their means, who saved for a rain date, you are a sucker. when you're struggling to pay your own mortgage, you shouldn't be forced to pay your neighbors as well. the program is unfair to taxpayers, according to the congressional budget office, accountability office, they say that hamp, t.a.r.p., 50 billion-dollar program will lose 100% of the taxpayer investment. although i curious a note under the majority member for this hearing under this subchapter entit
and illinois to continue another campaign of sorts. selling the recovery to small town rural america, which in these parts is still hurting a little bit. at a town hall yesterday, the president avoid the goldman chaos back in washington. he didn't have any four-letter words to drop but did get in a dig at republicans who he says a are blow blocking efforts to reform banking laws. take a listen how he basically says arizona has legalized racial profiling. >> you can imagine if you are a hispanic american in arizona, your great grandparents may have been there before arizona was even a state. but now suddenly, if you don't have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you're going to be harassed. that's something that could potentially happen. that's not the right way to go. >> now, savannah, that was part of a town hall. he wasn't planning on making immigration remarks but the audience knowing it was the news decided to ask. another issue in the news though that he avoided has been goldman. all that stuff was happening yesterday. he didn't say a word about goldman. it will be
right? megyn: i'm megyn kelly, this is "america live" with new defenderments on a stunning story. a gop fundraiser, the woman you see on the sidewalk beaten and stomped by attackers. new questions whether politics led thugs to break her leg and her boyfriend's nose. the guy behind the idea to infiltrate tea party rallies is a public school teacher. you know what that is. talk about getting smacked. a debate over in-school punishment that could have the u.s. congress stepping in. this will affect every student. the punishment police on "america live" now. first a fox news alert. in the last hour the fighting got fierce over the *'s controversial pick for the judgeship. the judiciary committee questioning goodwin liu. this is a liberal court, it many right complete u.s. supreme court. republicans hammering liu over what they call an attack on justice sam alito before he got on the supreme court. senators throwing around words like racist and outrageous. this all happening in just the last hour. eyesight as vicious and emotionally and racially charged >> i heard comments made sugges
around an spreading potentially could become america's worth environmental disaster in decades. >> we have over 100,000 feet of boom and they're working nonstop, protecting all the areas that we can get to that are yeek logically and economically sensitive. >> reporter: british petroleum has mobilized more than 1100 worker, 76 vessels and 400,000 feet of boom trying to protect miles of fragile shore line. eight days after the deep water who are rye zn oil rig went down, this disaster is far worse than first believed. coast guard officials now estimate as many 5/,000 barrels of oil pour into the gulf every day. that's five times higher than earlier estimates. they've already identified a third leak, 5,000 feet under water, in an oil pipeline called a riser. it could take 90 days to plug the leak. and by then, as many as 19 million gases could have leaked into the gulf. like so many people look the gulf coast, sport fisherman steve kennedy is worried. >> it's a matter of how many boats they got out there skimming. there'sing for to be some come ashore. >> reporter: with a disaster this
immigrants crossing from mexico and from central america. so the reality that the police officers will be given free reign to question and ask, that's racial profiling at its best. >> we've been bringing you both sides even before it became front-page news and ignited heated debate nation wide. i had the arizona lawmaker who authored the bill in the newsroom. let's do this. let's roll the portion of that interview with state senator russell pierce. >> it's outrageous that we continue to have the anarchists and the open border while phoenix has 50% of the hom sized of phoenix are committed by illegal aliens. phoenix is number two in the world in kidnappings. it's become the home invasion, carjacking and identity theft capital of the world. we're not putting up with it anymore. >> so let's focus on the concern over violence. our josh levs has a bit of a fact check. josh. >> at the time when you heard the numbers we thought we have to fact check this. of course, we do. the idea about half of the homicides in that area coming from illegal immigrants. let me go straight to the facts fo
's greatest years may not still lie before it, that some sort of way of life or some vision of america that they had in the past is changing and indeed, the country is changing. it's much more diverse. this is not a bipolar world anymore where you have the u.s.-soviet competition looming over everything else. it's a multipolar world where the challenges are as much economic as military and come from all parts of the world where we don't have a manufacturing base like we used to. there's a lot of dislocation going on and i think what you see is a lot of people who sense that dislocation intensely and react to it as we all react to something that's new and unfamiliar and frightening. >> and more so than either democrats or republican, tea party members, 84% of them have a negative opinion of barack obama and the job he's doing. 96% of them have a bad opinion of the way congress is doing its job. this is one representative voice, michele bachmann at today's rally. >> it is all about this coming november. we have to take the house f then the senate and two years from now, barack obama is a
, these practices supported a widely-praised initiative to increase homeownership in america. yet as we now know, homeownership reached unsustainable levels and became too much of a good thing. like all the players in the home mortgage market, bank managers at wamu and elsewhere mistakenly believed they were effectively averting risks by moving loans off their books and securitizing them. similarly, homeowners received little risk in their adjustable rate mortgages because they thought they could sell their homes at a profit before rate resets kicked in. investors believed mortgage-backed securities carried little risk because credit rating agencies rated them highly. those beliefs proved misplaced when the real estate market collapsed, the secondary market froze and the risks turned out to be all too real. the fallout hit financial institutions large and small with state and federal charters overseen by every banking industry regulator. since wamu's failure, the ots has taken lessons to heart from our own internal failed thrifts, and we have made strides to address the resulting recommendations
our way at of this crisis. we have to earn our way out. we have to put america back to work again. his approach is addressing that. >> last week, i announced some additional -- additional targets steps. they will give added boost to small business by building on the tax cuts in the recovery act and increasing access to the lungs desperately -- loans desperately needed for small businesses to grow. i called for the extension of emergency relief like unemployment insurance and health benefits to help those who have lost their jobs while boosting consumer spending and promoting job growth. we also want to take some strategic surgical steps in areas that are going to generate the greatest number of jobs while generating the greatest value for our economy. for the moment we took office, -- from the moment we took office, we began investing in a newer, stronger foundations for lasting growth. when that would free us from the cycle of boom and bust that has been so painful. one that can create good jobs and opportunities for a growing middle class. that is at the heart of our effort. [applaus
to understand is, here again, the politicians are behind this. if you check out every working person in america, the vast majority are opposed to making 30 million -- and it is not 11 million, those are lies. 30 million illegal citizens. just like here in washington yesterday, somebody said that he wants to pass a resolution in a council where our city will not do business with arizona. who the hell is he to speak for washingtonians? this is the kind of thing that we have to be mindful of i am glad that you are taking a stance down there. mr. obama needs to be working on jobs instead of immigration. that is what he needs to be working on. before this is over with, we might all have to be working in strawberry fields and chicken factories because it is going to be a long time before jobs come back to america. even before the great depression, gas did not come back until the war. these jobs that people say americans do not want, and i do not believe that. i never see anyone jumping up and down in the streets for legalizing. host: he talked about washington, d.c. council actions. i have heard abou
a common goal. america's beverage companies have removed full-calorie soft drinks from schools, reducing beverage calories by 88%. together with schools, we're helping kids make more balanced choices every day. ♪ >>> will the top firm on wall street become the top fall guy on capitol hill? next hour, sen torgs aators ared to grill the leading executives of goldman sachs. they want to know if the company's zeal for profits contributed to the country's financial crisis. after 20 years in a miami prison, manuel noriega gets a flight to paris and a quick return to jail. the former pan mainian dictator was extra dieted to stand trial on charges he laundered drug money. they seized noriega after invading panama in 1989. he has been held as a p.o.w. they wanted him back to stand trial on murder charges. the u.s. gave him to france instead. >>> gages israel's patience over iran. the pentagon and state department getting involved taking a look at where the military stands and the issue of a possible war. a presidential pop-in -- >>> presidential pop-in, president obama wanted to talk to israeli
of main street america, leaving them out would be another mistake. rather than focusing on concerns of wall street, i spend my time focusing on the concerns shared with me by my constituents back in missouri. missourians expect real reform, but demand that congress -- one specific area of concern is the creation of the so-called consumer financial protection bureau. the cfpb, this massive government bureaucracy has unprecedented authority and enforcement powers to impose duplicative mandates. we're not talking about big banks, but also your community banker, local dentist, as a result, there will be no choice but to pass these added costs on to consumers, the very bill is -- peep -- the people the -- people this bill was designed to protect. the only way to ensure the cfpb does not unintentionally hurt well-performing institutioning that issue credit is to narrow the scope and authority with clear language outlining who this new regulator will regulate. surely my colleagues would not want to vote for a bill that creates a new government bureaucracy without knowing exactly what the b
is too big? isn't that the whole idea of america, like trying to grow your company to become as big as possible? i don't know, that struck me as very interesting that now we're going to have a whole new era of determining whether or not companies are too big? >> well -- >> so if the republicans can block the vote today, the republicans will have a better footeding going forward to get a bill more to their liking. coming up straight ahead -- that's very true, steve. coming up, the reverend al sharpton threatening to fight arizona's new immigration law with civil disobedience. the sheriff next, he has something to say about that. >> please, don't stop the music. pop star rhianna takes a big tumble. and it's all caught -- >> there she goes. >> why does she wear those heels? >> tumble! [ isabella ] hi, i'm isabella, and this is pasta night at our house. [ laughter ] what is it about spaghetti and meatballs? i mean, it's a fun night. and the whole dinner is from great value at walmart. and it's all for less than $2 a serving. i have a budget like anyone else. this is what i did with mi
. this is the fastest growing minority in america. let's keep in mind, 50 percent, 50 percent of the children born in america are brown. jon: let me cut this one short. the president has entered the rose garden, he's about to speak on immigration, as well as the new gdp numbers. let's listen in. >> the department of interior and homeland security, as well as the administrator of the eps, my assistant for energy and climate change policy, and the noah administrator to the gulf coast to ensure we continue to do everything necessary to respond to this event, and i expect their reports today. as i said yesterday, bp is ultimately responsible under the law for paying the cost of response and cleanup operations, but we are fully prepared to meet our responsibilities to any and all affected communities. that's why we've been working closely with state and local authorities since the day of the explosion. there are now five staging areas to protect sensitive shore lines. approximately 1900 federal response personnel are in the area, and more than 300 response vessels and aircraft iran the -- on the screen
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christmas with a bomb in his underwear. more on good morning america beginning at 7:00 this morning. >> still ahead on good morning washinton, the fight against aids taken outside the city borders. a surprising new study about the growing affection -- infection rates in the suburbs. >> in the south there is the cleanup continuing after the deadly twisters. >> brian van de graaff will have the seven-day forecast and >> people are cleaning up and assessing the damage after the deadly tornadoes that swept through the south. nearly 700 homes were damaged on a weekend. if that is in mississippi alone. 12 people were killed. then in mississippi, two in alabama. if officials are tallying the costs so they can ask for federal emergency declaration. >> good morning. brian van de graaff outside the studio in roslyn. we do have clouds overhead right now. the drizzle is coming to an end. as the morning wears on, we should see more sunshine before the next batch of clouds arrives. let's show you what the temperature is look like. we are in the '50s for the most part. you can see clouds hanging
to the streets of america. there were half a million in los angeles. there were 350,000, i think, in dallas/fort worth, that area as well. also, there was some backlash because remember at a number of these rallies, they actually -- they were talking about becoming americans but they were flying the mexican flag and they were flying flags from south america and stuff like that and suddenly, there was some backlash so if they are planning some big rallies, beware, there could be some backlash this time as well. >> it's an interesting irony because -- because of the freedom of speech here in this country, they're allowed to do that. >> well, of course. all right, so in the meantime, let's talk a little bit about a drink that you maybe have guzzled once or twice before. it's called the arizona ice tea. but they're facing some backlash now because of the name of the drink and they were all of their drinkers to know that they actually don't make their drink in arizona. it's actually made in new york. >> it's a new york drink so stop protesting arizona. it just happens to be the name and by the w
on all this protection stuff and financial reform is everybody in america, you're on your own, protect yourself, don't do an investment unless you understand it. >> if you e-fe oe-file, within hours after you receive that they got your e-file, you can type in the search window, where is my money? you will need your social security number, filing status. >> and exact amount of your refund. >> you can get instant feedback. let's talk about survey that was conducted. big research outlets asking people, do you believe u.s. government is wildly spending your tax dollars? in general what do people say? >> 12.4% said yes. 87.6% of the people surveyed said no, they are not using it well. they have priorities for those tax dollars that makes so much sense, but washington isn't listening. >> big research out of ohio did it exclusively for us, for the dolans and our cnn segment. 18% said we want a comprehensive -- number one choice, by the way, 18.6% said we want a comprehensive jobs program for the millions of unemployed americans. >> 16.7% want to reduce the budget deficit. >> also 16.7% say, p
states of america was one of the greatest days for alternative energy. united states of america entered the 21st century with offshore wind. next, are these offshore title farms because you know what? we're now behind spain, portugal, scotland and australia, that already have pilot projects in place and they're moving. >> do you have concerns with wind turbines and birds and what you're talking about, wave turbines that take energy from the motion of the waves and fish? >> no. no. i mean, yes, there are some environmental concerns, but you know what? we do live in the 21st century. we're not going to go back to eating mud pies and living in a grass hut. we're in the business of business and we've got to supply energy and energy is the game here and we've got to do it more environmentally friendly because look at this situation that's unfolding, contessa. and it hasn't even come ashore yet and it's unacceptable. >> reece, while i'm talking to you, we've got the shot up of the white house press briefing room. we're expecting not only robert gibbs, but janet napolitano and some folks from
, the relationship is ongoing and fine and continuous. strange way to characterize the relationship with america's closest allyally. >> it's one of our closest friends and alleies and we havea lot of issues. as i understand it, the israelis are sending a strong delegation to this summit and i think that the most important issue here is how to make the peace process go forward. that is something that is the center of u.s.-israeli relations in terms of working towards stability in the middle east. >> there was more criticism for the president from the republican side. liz cheney last night in new orleans. let me show you what he had to say. what she had to say, excuse me. >> it seems to me increasingly clare that there are three prongs to the obama doctrine. apologize for america, abandon our allies and appease our enemies. >> she was saying that the president had not been enough of an alley to netanyahu, but karzai. i'm not sure this is the right moment to be endorsing what karzai's been saying, but how do you analyze the u.s. relationship with afghanistan? we've got all of our troops there and a
into this and they will revive their contract with america in 2010. host: milton, independent line. arnot -- vernon dean of beach, florida -- fernandina beach, florida. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think the democrat or republican or the independence or however, if they had just a few seconds to think about this, they will know that the reason this is coming about now -- democrats -- i am talking about kerry, talking about lieberman, and even the republican senator lindsey graham, they were pushing this 10 years ago and the democrats said no, no, no, it will take 10 years to realize any benefit. it has been 10 years ago and they did not drill 10 years ago, so we don't have the oil now. 10 years from now, we won't have any drilling whatsoever. whether you objected to it or you accepted this fact, the method, as the last gentleman said, was to try to get some helps for the cap-and-trade -- anyone in their right mind. i am not an activist, but i do have my own opinions. offering a carrot in one hand but a stick in the other. host: what is the matter with that, milton? isn't that how politics works? calle
that brought these 50 states together to form this great united states of america. allow it to fall fresh among this great governing body as they make decisions affecting over 300 million americans. father, at this time we join our hearts, minds and spirits for our fellow miners in west virginia who have suffered a great loss in the midst of tragedy. out of the depths of our pressing need, praying that i will draw near onto us during this dark hour of time in jesus name, amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house her approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from alabama, mr. griffith. mr. griffith: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman from west virginia, congressman rahall, is recognized for one minute. mr. rahall: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, it
. truth, lies, and videotapes, on "america live" right now. >>> but we begin with a fox news alert, the feds now say they have put an end to a terrifying string of attempted bombings targeting americans. just an hour ago, atf agents announcing this guy, larry north, is now being linked to a series of explosives left in postal drop boxes across texas. at least three dozen incendiary devices placed in 23 different locations since the beginning of february. k rivment s gutierrez, live from the dallas bureau with the breaking news, kris, how did they catch this guy? >> megyn, prosecutors are telling us that 52-year-old larry north had been on the radar screen and considered a person of interest for the past week, so what they did is made a surveillance team follow him everywhere he went, 24 hours a day and actually one of those surveillance teams reported they saw him putting another explosive device into a mailbox in a shopping center outside of a tyler shopping mall. they saw him do that yesterday. then when they moved in to arrest him they said they found another explosive device in
this is a very important adjunct to america's transportation system. now having said all of that and complimented you sufficiently, let me -- >> devil's lake on your mind, senator? >> mr. swkrao: yes, it is. yes, it is. you mentioned i think that the empire builder is probably one of the most successful long distance trains on the amtrak system. the senator from washington knows that, because that's where the empire bear in minder ends up. over -- builder ends up. over half a million people get on that train from chicago to seattle, it goes through north dakota and we face a problem. we have chronic lake flooding that's been going on for a dozen years now in what is called devil's lake. dramatic flooding. i think it's the only circumstance other than the great salt lake, where you have a closed basin, we don't quite understand where all of this is going to go, but the lake has increased in height, i think 25 feet now, and it just continues to rise. this year, it's expected to rise again. we have a bridge near church's ferry on a track owned by burlington northern, where amtrak, i believe, slows d
about humankind. she was a true believer that if america really did what it was supposed to do to the brothers and sisters and the citizens that made up this great country, then fairness and equity would determine that all people are truly treated equally. and even though she wasn't born in the city of new york, we are so proud she went to new york university, even though she was turned down with a scholarship at bernard college, that she stayed there and worked in our harlem ymca, that she was confidant to adam clayton powell at his church and counseled his father who was pastor before him. time is beginning to record that there's been a lot of people that struggled to make this great country all she can be and when the final word is written, there's no question in my mind that dorothy height will not just go down as a black civil rights leader. she will go down as a great american who recognized that bringing together this country, black, white, jew, gentile, catholic, and protestant, by bringing this all together, she has indeed made this a better world. she's made it a bett
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